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Phoenix NewsTrain 2018
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Train in social, mobile, data, graphics, writing, open records, digital tools and more at Phoenix NewsTrain on April 6-7, 2018

REGISTER HERE

The Particulars

When: 1 p.m. to 5:55 p.m. Friday, April 6, and 8:30 a.m. to 5:10 p.m. Saturday, April 7, 2018

Where: Second floor, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, 555 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, Arizona. Here is a campus map.

Cost: Early-bird registration is just $75. The early-bird rate ends March 6, with registration increasing to $85 on March 7.

Special offer: Free AP Stylebooks awarded to the first 20 registrants.

Meals: Your registration includes light breakfast and lunch on Saturday. 

Is this workshop for you? This workshop is for reporters, editors and other journalists from print, digital and broadcast newsrooms of all sizes, as well as journalism educators and students. Public information officers and public relations specialists have also benefited from attending NewsTrain. You do not have to be a member of APME to attend.

Registration for groups: Email Laura Sellers, NewsTrain program assistant.

Diversity scholarships: The deadline to apply for a competitive diversity scholarship for Phoenix NewsTrain is Feb. 20, 2018. Applications are open to journalists, journalism educators or journalism students from a diverse background, Successful applicants have their registration fee waived; they must pay their own travel expenses. Apply online; also, email a current résumé and up to three work samples (published or unpublished) to David Cuillier, associate professor and director of the University of Arizona School of JournalismJournalism educators need not submit work samples.

What to bring: A fully charged laptop and smartphone for the exercises.

Lodging: Here are two hotel options:

1: Holiday Inn Express & Suites, 620 N. 6th St., which is 0.5 mile from the Cronkite School. By March 12, call 602-452-2020 and ask for the NewsTrain rate of $129 a night.  The rate includes free WiFi and breakfast.

2: The Westin Phoenix Downtown, 333 N. Central Ave., which is 1.5 blocks from the Cronkite School. By March 7, call 866-961-3775 and ask for the NewsTrain block at $219 a night.

Airport transportation: Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport provides information on ground transportation, including the light rail to downtown, which costs $2 one way. For The Westin Phoenix Downtown and the nearby Cronkite School, take the westbound train from the 44th Street/Washington Light Rail Station, accessible from the airport using its free PHX Sky Train. Exit at the Van Buren/Central Ave Light Rail Station, which stops at the Westin, in 17 minutes. Schedules for the light rail, known as Valley Metro Rail, are here.

Local donors: Coming soon.

SponsorAssociated Press Media Editors (APME). Please see the complete list of donors who support NewsTrain at the bottom of this page.

Hosts: Arizona Broadcasters Association, Arizona Newspapers Association, Valley of the Sun chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, The Arizona Republic, Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, Arizona Daily Star, Indian Country News, Arizona Interscholastic Press Association and The Associated Press

Questions: Email Laura Sellers, NewsTrain program assistant, or Linda Austin, project director.

Phoenix NewsTrain will offer a day and a half of digital training on April 6 and 7, 2018, at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. 

Training Sessions Include:

  • 10 habits of highly effective open-records users
  • How to write short AND well
  • Getting your story read: maximizing and measuring social media for branding and audience engagement
  • Mining data for enterprise stories off any beat
  • Storytelling on mobile: making smart choices
  • Creating simple graphics for mobile
  • Meet the best digital reporting tools
  • What's missing in border and immigration coverage

Early-bird registration is $75 through March 6; the rate increases to $85 on March 7. Competitive diversity scholarships are available for journalists, journalism students and journalism educators from diverse backgrounds; see the information to the right for how to apply.

Your Trainers

  • Sarah Cohen, Knight Chair in data journalism at the Cronkite School.

  • David Cuillier, associate professor and director of the University of Arizona School of Journalism.

  • Laura E. Davisdigital news director of the Annenberg Media Center at the University of Southern California.

    Courtland Jeffrey, data visualizer at KNXV-ABC15.

  • Jessica Pucci, Ethics and Excellence professor of practice, data analysis and audience engagement at the Cronkite School.

  • Vanessa Ruiz, director of the Cronkite News Borderlands team and professor of practice at the Cronkite School.

  • Fernanda Santos, Southwest Borderlands Initiative professor of practice at the Cronkite School.

  • Jim Small, executive director and editor of the Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting.

  • Evan Wyloge, senior reporter for the Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Tell short-form narrative stories that engage readers on any platform.
  • Identify the best way to tell a particular story on a small screen.
  • Identify a data set from your beat that will likely produce a story, and sort and filter in Excel to locate a potential story.
  • Improve your writing on social media, establish your brand, encourage community engagement, and measure how well your social media efforts are working.
  • Streamline your reporting with tech tools and platforms that will help you obtain and manipulate data, without knowing any code.
  • React effectively to common obstacles to obtaining public records and identify as least one public record to request to enhance your coverage.
  • Provide nuanced, balanced coverage of border and immigration issues that incorporates diverse voices.
  • Make your own simple graphics for mobile.

Agenda

   

(Download a PDF of the agenda.)

 

The blue and green tracks on the agenda allow for smaller class sizes. All attendees receive the same instruction, just at different times.

 

REGISTER HERE

 

More on Your Trainers

 

Sarah Cohen is the Knight Chair focusing on data journalism. She came to the Cronkite School after a 25-year career in news, most recently leading a group of New York Times reporters who focused on data- and document-driven investigations. As a database editor at The Washington Post, she shared in the Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting and was a Pulitzer finalist for public service. She also served as the first Knight Chair in computational journalism at Duke University and as an adjunct instructor at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. Cohen also is a past president of Investigative Reporters and Editors, a 5,000-member training organization for journalists. @Sarahcnyt

 

David Cuillier is associate professor and director of the University of Arizona School of Journalism, where he teaches and researches data journalism and access to public records. Before earning his Ph.D. from Washington State University in 2006, he was a newspaper reporter and editor in the Pacific Northwest. He is co-author of  the book, "The Art of Access: Strategies for Acquiring Public Records"; a member of the Freedom of Information Committee and former president of the Society of Professional Journalists; and a board member for the National Freedom of Information Coalition. @DavidCuillier

 

Laura E. Davis is an assistant professor of professional practice and the digital news director of the Annenberg Media Center at the University of Southern California. She has worked as a reporter at The Associated Press; a home page, social media and politics editor at Yahoo News; the deputy mobile editor at the Los Angeles Times; and a mobile editor at BuzzFeed, where she helped develop and launch the award-winning BuzzFeed News app. @lauraelizdavis

 

Courtland Jeffrey works at KNXV-ABC15 in Phoenix as its data visualizer with a heavy focus on visualizations and new-media formats. He graduated with honors from ASU's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication with a combined bachelor's and master's degree. Born and raised in the Valley, Jeffrey enjoys utilizing his professional skills to further explore the area and tell new stories. @court_jeffrey

Jessica Pucci is a specialist in content analysis and audience engagement. She leads social media and analytics for Cronkite News, which is the news division of Arizona PBS, and teaches a course in analytics and engagement. Previously, Pucci led audience-driven brand journalism, content strategy and engagement for large national home-design and retail clients at the communications agency, Manifest. She also was the managing editor at the consumer magazine DRAFT, overseeing the organization’s print, digital and social media, and has contributed to many national magazines. @Jessica_Pucci

Vanessa Ruiz directs the borderlands coverage team at Cronkite News; helps lead the Spanish-language newscast, Cronkite Noticias; and works on special productions at Arizona PBS. Before coming to Cronkite, Ruiz was the main evening news anchor for KPNX, the NBC affiliate station in Phoenix. Her career began with Telemundo Network’s national newscast, becoming Telemundo International’s youngest news anchor before transitioning into the English-speaking market at WSVN-FOX Miami. Ruiz also has worked for KNBC in Los Angeles and the Broadcasting Board of Governors for TV Marti. She is an Emmy winner and has been recognized by the Academy of Arts & Sciences. She received the David Burke Distinguished Journalism Award and was chosen as one of Florida's Leading Latinos in Journalism. She is an active member of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. @VanessaRuizNews

Fernanda Santos is a Southwest Borderlands Initiative professor of practice, teaching short-form and long-form narrative journalism. She joined Cronkite after 12 years at The New York Times, including five as its Phoenix Bureau chief. Her first book, “The Fire Line: The Story of the Granite Mountain Hotshots,” received the Western Writers of America 2017 Spur Award for Best First Nonfiction Book. Her coverage of demographic changes in New England’s first majority-minority city won a Sigma Delta Chi Award in Public Service from the Society of Professional Journalists. Santos is a recipient of the Kiplinger, International Reporting Project, and Casey Children and Family fellowships. @ByFernandaS

Jim Small is the executive director and editor of the Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. His journalism work has largely focused on state government and politics, first as a reporter for the Arizona Capitol Times, then as editor of the paper and its prestigious sister publications, the Yellow Sheet Report and Arizona Legislative Report. Under his guidance, the Capitol Times won numerous state, regional and national awards for its accountability journalism and probing investigations into state government operations, many of which were rooted in data collection and analysis@JimSmall

Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting's Evan Wyloge  began as a journalist in 2003, and has focused on accountability and watchdog reporting, with an emphasis on data analysis, since 2008. He earned a political science degree from Northern Arizona University and a master’s degree in journalism from Arizona State University. He’s passionate about investigative reporting that has real impact and that uncovers stories that would have otherwise gone uncovered.@EvanWyloge

REGISTER HERE

Session Specifics

10 habits of highly effective open-records users What do savvy users of the state open-records law know and how can you apply their techniques to your coverage? Find out from David Cuillier.

How to write short AND well With news organizations from The Washington Post to Quartz telling reporters to either write short or write long and avoid the dreaded middle-length story, the ability to write short AND well has become crucial. Learn from Fernanda Santos how to tell short-form narrative stories that engage readers on any platform.

Getting your story read: maximizing and measuring social media for branding and audience engagement Instructor Jessica Pucci offers tactics and tips to improve your writing on social media, establish your brand, encourage community engagement, and measure how well your social media efforts are working.

Mining data for enterprise stories off any beat How do you fit enterprise stories around the many other demands you face as a beat reporter to write dailies, file web updates, tweet and shoot video? One way is to take advantage of the plethora of local data available online to spot and develop unique stories for your news outlet. All you need is either you or someone else in your newsroom who can download and sort databases in a spreadsheet program, such as Excel. Learn from Sarah Cohen how to find and analyze data, enabling you to spot the enterprise stories in the numbers, whether your beat is sports, health, business, education, local government or cops and courts. Bring your laptop for the exercises.

Storytelling on mobile: making smart choices  More than eight in 10 U.S. adults now get news on a mobile deviceWe need a new storytelling tool kit to attract and better serve our audience on mobile. Learn from instructor Laura E. Davis what’s the best way to tell a particular story on a small screen: digest, explainer, bulleted live updates or what-we-know lists, photo, video, graphic, audio, games, curation, or some combination? And what are the tools to make that happen as efficiently as possible?

Creating simple graphics for mobile Sometimes the best way to tell the story on mobile is with a graphic. Courtland Jeffrey will show you how to make your own simple graphics using free tools. Bring your laptop for the exercises.

Meet the best digital reporting tools Whether you’re an investigative journalist or a daily beat reporter, free and low-cost technical tools and apps can help you improve and streamline your reporting. Instructors Jim Small and Evan Wyloge will introduce you to tech tools and platforms that will help you obtain and manipulate data. You’ll learn how to scrape social accounts, without knowing any code. And you’ll discover how to use features, such as advanced search, that are built into Google and social networks in more powerful ways. Plus, learn about popular (free!) project-management software and applications to help you collaborate with colleagues and manage reporting projects.

What's missing in border and immigration coverage In an era of deep political polarization, learn from Vanessa Ruiz how to provide nuanced, balanced coverage of border and immigration issues that incorporates diverse voices.

Our Donors

NewsTrain's recent donors include The Associated PressThe APME Foundation, the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation, Scripps Howard FoundationGateHouse Media LLC, Pepper Hamilton LLPLevine Sullivan Koch & Schulz LLP, the Park and Sigma Delta Chi foundations and APME past and present board members. To join them in supporting NewsTrain, please make your tax-deductible contribution here

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